Reviews: Eddie and the Slumber Sisters – Corn Exchange, Haddington; Baba Yaga – Perth Theatre

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First published in The Times, Saturday May 12 2018

Eddie and the Slumber Sisters: Three Stars

Baba Yaga: Four Stars

Catherine Wheels, the leading purveyors of children’s theatre in Scotland, are drawn to subjects other companies would flinch from tackling. Their acclaimed show, The Voice Thief, drew on horror and sci-fi tropes in its depiction of patriarchal tyranny and suppression, while HUFF, created with Shona Reppe and Andy Manley, presented the Three Little Pigs’ house as a crime scene.

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Review: Creditors – Lyceum, Edinburgh

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First published in The Times, Thursday May 3 2018

Four Stars

August Strindberg wrote Creditors in 1888 as part of the creative torrent that also produced his most famous work, Miss Julie. Both plays exhibit the visceral dialogue and intense exploration of shifts in power within relationships for which the prolific and influential Swedish playwright is known, while also giving vent to his mordant and rather contradictory view of women. He was known to refer to Siri von Essen, the first of his three wives, as “the vampire”, though he also maintained that “the presence of women tends to elevate men”.

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Review: Gut – Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh

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First published in The Times, Friday April 27 2018

Three Stars

Clearly, there is something in the zeitgeist. From Outnumbered to Motherland, there has been a steady trickle of television sitcoms in recent years lampooning the chaos, guilt and tedium of modern parenting. Frances Poet’s latest play occupies the same gaudy terrain of soft play centres, nurseries and adventure playgrounds. Yet, aside from one amusing sequence involving a tussle between two adults over a Kermit the Frog figurine, its mood never strays far from the dark end of the spectrum.

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Review: Long Day’s Journey Into Night – Citizens Theatre, Glasgow

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First published in The Times, Saturday April 21 2018

Four Stars

“Enough is not as good as a feast!” cries Edmund Tyrone (Lorn Macdonald), tossing back the latest in a long line of whisky shots. In an age of rapid-fire 90-minute plays with no interval, a revival of Eugene O’Neill’s masterpiece at the Citizens certainly feels like a good old-fashioned theatrical banquet, albeit a well-oiled one.

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Review: Tell Me the Truth About Love – Sage Gateshead

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First published in The Times, Wednesday April 18 2018

Three Stars

In 2002 the inaugural production from Streetwise Opera, which works with people affected by homelessness, was a staging of Benjamin Britten’s Canticles at Westminster Abbey in London. So it is a nice touch that this show should take its title from one of Britten’s Cabaret Songs, written in collaboration with WH Auden.

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Review: Bunny – Tron Theatre, Glasgow

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First published in The Times, Saturday March 31 2018

Three Stars

Jack Thorne’s monologue about a teenage girl who finds herself caught up in a revenge attack on a young Asian boy debuted in one of the dank, dark venues on the Cowgate at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2010. Since then, the writer has gone on to script the West End and Broadway megahit Harry Potter and the Cursed Child as well as winning five BAFTA awards for his work on television dramas such as This is England and National Treasure.

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Review: Richard III – Perth Theatre

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First published in The Times, Monday March 26

Four Stars

Some Richards are so grotesquely charismatic that they overwhelm everything else onstage. This was the case with Lars Eidinger’s performance as the Machiavellian prince in Thomas Ostermeier’s acclaimed production of Shakespeare, which stopped off at the Edinburgh International Festival a couple of years back. The German actor exploded the stage at the Lyceum with a raucous turn that included berating members of the audience and enticing the entire house into chanting along with his most profane lines.

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