Review: Rocket Post! – Platform, Easterhouse

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First published in The Times, Saturday September 30 2017

Three Stars

A rocket filled with letters fired from one island to another sounds like the premise for an offbeat fairy tale or children’s fantasy. The image is a resonant one, combining benign public service with a technology more commonly used in warfare. The idea is all the more intriguing when you consider that Lewis Hetherington’s new play for young people is based on true events.

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Review: How to Act – Summerhall, Edinburgh

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First published in The Times, Friday August 25 2017

Three Stars

Legend has it that when Dustin Hoffman was filming Marathon Man, the renowned method actor stayed up for 72 hours so his performance as a sleep-deprived torture victim would be authentic. His co-star, Lawrence Olivier, was scathing: “My dear boy, why don’t you just try acting?”

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Review: The Last Queen of Scotland – Underbelly Cowgate, Edinburgh

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First published in The Times, Friday August 11 2017

Four Stars

Idi Amin had such an obsession with Scotland that he regularly wore kilts, relaxed to bagpipe music and named four of his sons Campbell, McLaren, McKenzie and Mackintosh. For Jaimini Jethwa, growing up in Dundee in the 1970s, the fascination was mutual. Jethwa and her family were among the 60,000 south Asians expelled from Uganda by the dictator in 1972. Following a spell in a refugee camp in Kent, Jethwa’s parents opted to resettle in the “Jute City” because, unlike other parts of the UK, there was no waiting list.

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Review: Adam – Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh

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First published in The Times, Wednesday August 9 2017

Three Stars

So much happens in this new show from the National Theatre of Scotland that it seems impossible that it only runs for 75 minutes. A loose companion piece to Jo Clifford’s Eve, which also debuts as part of this year’s Traverse festival programme, Adam charts an Egyptian transgender man’s early life, including his experience of homelessness, abuse, mental illness and self-harm, before he is reborn – in every sense – at the age of nineteen, in Scotland.

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Review: The 306: Day – Station Hotel, Perth

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First published in The Times, Tuesday May 16 2017

Four Stars

When, a year ago, the National Theatre of Scotland unveiled the first instalment in its proposed trilogy of plays addressing the forgotten voices of World War I, the company effectively created a bespoke theatre space in a vast barn on a Perthshire farm. This follow-up, again written by the playwright Olivier Emanuel, with music by Gareth Williams, shifts the focus from a trio of men shot for cowardice or desertion during the Great War to women munitions workers, pacifists and suffragettes. The production, directed by Jemima Levick, has a stripped-back, intimate feel, and is being toured around smaller venues the length and breadth of Scotland.

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Review: Anything That Gives Off Light – Edinburgh International Conference Centre

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First published in The Times, Monday August 22 2016

Two Stars

The prospect of a second co-production between the National Theatre of Scotland and the New York-based Theatre of the Emerging Moment (TEAM) is mouth-watering. Their first collaborative piece, Architecting, which drew on characters from Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind to show how history is constructed through popular culture, won awards at the fringe in 2008.

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Review: The 306: Dawn – Dalcrue Farm, Perthshire

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First published in The Times, Wednesday June 1 2016

Three Stars

 

Since its inauguration a decade ago, the National Theatre of Scotland has staged work in a number of remarkable places, including pubs, a swimming pool and Edinburgh International Airport. The latest production is perhaps its most adventurous undertaking yet. Audiences are bussed from Perth Concert Hall to an ambitiously reconfigured barn in a field in nearby Pitcairngreen. This is the immersive setting for Oliver Emanuel’s haunting play about three soldiers who were shot for cowardice during the First World War.

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